The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire Studies in Middle Eastern History

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Oxford University Press #ad - Furthermore, they played central roles in the public culture of sovereignty--royal ceremonial, monumental building, and patronage of artistic production. Within the dynasty, like the hierarchy of male power, the hierarchy of female power, reflected the broader society's control for social control of the sexually active.

Royal women were custodians of sovereign power, training their sons in its use and exercising it directly as regents when necessary. The unprecedented political power of the Ottoman imperial harem in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries is widely viewed as illegitimate and corrupting. By examining political action in the context of household networks, indeed an intended, Leslie Peirce demonstrates that female power was a logical, consequence of political structures.

The Imperial Harem: Women and Sovereignty in the Ottoman Empire Studies in Middle Eastern History #ad - The imperial harem argues that the exercise of political power was tied to definitions of sexuality. This book examines the sources of royal women's power and assesses the reactions of contemporaries, which ranged from loyal devotion to armed opposition.

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Empress of the East: How a European Slave Girl Became Queen of the Ottoman Empire

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Basic Books #ad - The "fascinating. Lively" story of the russian slave girl Roxelana, who rose from concubine to become the only queen of the Ottoman empire New York Times. Suleyman became besotted with her and foreswore all other concubines. The bold and canny roxelana soon became a shrewd diplomat and philanthropist, from Isabella of Hungary to Catherine de Medici, who helped Suleyman keep pace with a changing world in which women, increasingly held the reins of power.

Then, in an unprecedented step, he freed her and married her. In empress of the east, historian leslie peirce tells the remarkable story of a Christian slave girl, Roxelana, who was abducted by slave traders from her Ruthenian homeland and brought to the harem of Sultan Suleyman the Magnificent in Istanbul.

Empress of the East: How a European Slave Girl Became Queen of the Ottoman Empire #ad - Until now roxelana has been seen as a seductress who brought ruin to the empire, but in Empress of the East, Peirce reveals the true history of an elusive figure who transformed the Ottoman harem into an institution of imperial rule.

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The Ottoman Age of Exploration

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Oxford University Press #ad - Challenging traditional narratives of western dominance, dynastic prestige, but ultimately bested the Portuguese in the game of global politics by using sea power, it argues that the Ottomans were not only active participants in the Age of Exploration, and commercial savoir faire to create their own imperial dominion throughout the Indian Ocean.

In 1517, the ottoman sultan selim "the grim" conquered Egypt and brought his empire for the first time in history into direct contact with the trading world of the Indian Ocean. During the decades that followed, the ottomans became progressively more engaged in the affairs of this vast and previously unfamiliar region, military and commercial challenge to the Portuguese Empire, eventually to the point of launching a systematic ideological, their main rival for control of the lucrative trade routes of maritime Asia.

The Ottoman Age of Exploration #ad - The ottoman age of exploration is the first comprehensive historical account of this century-long struggle for global dominance, a struggle that raged from the shores of the Mediterranean to the Straits of Malacca, and from the interior of Africa to the steppes of Central Asia. Based on extensive research in the archives of Turkey and Portugal, as well as materials written on three continents and in a half dozen languages, it presents an unprecedented picture of the global reach of the Ottoman state during the sixteenth century.

It does so through a dramatic recounting of the lives of sultans and viziers, soldiers-of-fortune, spies, corsairs, and women from the imperial harem.

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Harem: The World Behind the Veil

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Abbeville Press #ad - Croutier reveals their marital customs, child-rearing practices, and superstitions. Here, we learn of the labyrinthine political scheming among the sultan’s wives, his favorites, too, and the valide sultana—the sultan’s mother—whose power could eclipse that of the sultan himself. There were the harems of the sultans and the pashas, but there were also “middle-class” harems, the households in which ordinary men and women lived out ordinary—albeit polygamous—lives.

People around me often whispered things about harems; my own grandmother and her sister had been brought up in one. Drawing on a host of firsthand accounts and memoirs, croutier explores life in the world’s harems, as well as her own family history, from the Middle Ages to the early twentieth century, focusing on the fabled Seraglio of Topkapi Palace as a paradigm for them all.

A worldwide best seller, translated into twenty-five languages. I was born in a konak old house, which once was the harem of a pasha, ” writes Alev Lytle Croutier. Finally, and art—and how western ideas, she shows how this Eastern institution invaded the European imagination—in the form of decoration, costume, in turn, finally eroded a system that had seemed eternal.

Harem: The World Behind the Veil #ad - Juxtaposing a rich array of illustrations—Western paintings, Turkish and Persian miniatures, family photographs, and even film stills—Croutier demystifies the Western erotic fantasy of “the world behind the veil. This revised and updated 25th anniversary edition of Harem includes a new introduction by the author, revisiting her subject in light of recent events in Turkey, and the world.

We enter the slave markets and the lavish boudoirs of the sultanas; we witness the daily routines of the odalisques, and of the eunuchs who guarded the harem.

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In the House of the Law: Gender and Islamic Law in Ottoman Syria and Palestine

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University of California Press #ad - She challenges prevailing views on Islam and gender, revealing Islamic law to have been more fluid and flexible than previously thought. Although the legal system had a consistent patriarchal orientation, it was modulated by sensitivities to the practical needs of women, men, and children. In an rewarding new study, tucker explores the way in which Islamic legal thinkers understood Islam as it related to women and gender roles.

In her comprehensive overview of a field long neglected by scholars, including our own, Tucker deepens our understanding of how societies, construct gender roles. In seventeenth and eighteenth century syria and Palestine, or legal opinions, and Tucker shows how fatwas, Muslim legal thinkers gave considerable attention to women's roles in society, greatly influenced these roles.

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"Off the Straight Path": Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo Gender, Culture, and Politics in the Middle East

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Syracuse University Press #ad - Elyse semerdjian’s "off the straight path" takes a bold step toward filling that gap, offering a fascinating look at the historical progression of Islamic law’s treatment of illicit sex. Employing exceptional insight, "off the Straight Path" presents a powerful challenge to the traditional view of Islamic law, enabling a richer understanding of Islamic society.

Drawing on a wealth of shari ’a court records, Semerdjian brings to life Syrian society during the Ottoman period. Semerdjian provides a comprehensive review of the concept of zina, sexual indiscretion, exploring the diverse interpretation of zina crime as presented in a variety of sources from the Qur’an and hadith to legal literature.

"Off the Straight Path": Illicit Sex, Law, and Community in Ottoman Aleppo Gender, Culture, and Politics in the Middle East #ad - With vivid detail, she describes specific women’s lives and experiences as their cases are presented before the court. Important questions about the relationship between sexuality and the law and about the societies enforcing that relationship are rarely addressed in the current literature. The legal treatment of sexual behavior is a subject that receives little scholarly attention in the field of Middle East women’s studies.

Semerdjian argues that the actual treatment of zina crimes in the courts differs substantially from sentences prescribed by codifed Islamic jurisprudence. She then delves into the history of legal responses to zina within the specific community of Aleppo, Syria. In contrast to the violent corporal punishments dictated in the Islamic legal code, the courts often punished crimes of sexual indiscretion with nonviolent sentences, such as removal from the community.

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Between Two Worlds: The Construction of the Ottoman State

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University of California Press #ad - Cemal kafadar offers a much more subtle and complex interpretation of the early Ottoman period than that provided by other historians. His careful analysis of medieval as well as modern historiography from the perspective of a cultural historian demonstrates how ethnic, tribal, linguistic, religious, and political affiliations were all at play in the struggle for power in Anatolia and the Balkans during the late Middle Ages.

This highly original look at the rise of the ottoman empire—the longest-lived political entity in human history—shows the transformation of a tiny frontier enterprise into a centralized imperial state that saw itself as both leader of the world's Muslims and heir to the Eastern Roman Empire.

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Women Without Men: A Novel of Modern Iran

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The Feminist Press at CUNY #ad - Using the techniques of both the fabulist and the polemicist, Parsipur continues her protest against traditional Persian gender relations in this charming, powerful novella. Publishers Weekly. Parsipur is a courageous, talented woman, and above all, a great writer. Marjane satrapi, author of persepolis   this modern literary masterpiece follows the interwoven destinies of five women—including a wealthy middle-aged housewife, a prostitute, and a schoolteacher—as they arrive by different paths to live together in an abundant garden on the outskirts of Tehran.

Banned in iran, this national bestseller was eventually translated into several languages, giving new readers access to the witty and subversive work of a brilliant Persian writer. Reminiscent of a wry fable, Women Without Men creates an evocative and powerfully drawn allegory of life in contemporary Iran.

Women Without Men: A Novel of Modern Iran #ad - From an outspoken iranian author comes a “charming, powerful novella” that is banned in Iran for its depiction of female freedom Publishers Weekly. Drawing on elements of islamic mysticism and recent Iranian history, this unforgettable novel depicts women escaping the narrow confines of family and society, and imagines their future living in a world without men.

Shortly after the novel’s 1989 publication, Parsipur was arrested and jailed for her frank and defiant portrayal of women’s sexuality.

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The Concubine, the Princess, and the Teacher: Voices from the Ottoman Harem

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University of Texas Press #ad - But for the women and children who actually inhabited this realm of the imperial palace, the reality was vastly different. In the western imagination, miscegenation, power, the Middle Eastern harem was a place of sex, slavery, debauchery, riches, and sheer abandon. The memoirists show that, far from being a place of debauchery, the harem was a family home in which polite and refined behavior prevailed.

Their recollections of the ottoman harem reveal the rigid protocol and hierarchy that governed the lives of the imperial family and concubines, as well as the hundreds of slave women and black eunuchs in service to them. Douglas brookes explains the social structure of the nineteenth-century Ottoman palace harem in his introduction.

The Concubine, the Princess, and the Teacher: Voices from the Ottoman Harem #ad - These three memoirs, written across a half century and by women of differing social classes, offer a fuller and richer portrait of the Ottoman imperial harem than has ever before been available in English. In this collection of translated memoirs, three women who lived in the Ottoman imperial harem in Istanbul between 1876 and 1924 offer a fascinating glimpse "behind the veil" into the lives of Muslim palace women of the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries.

The memoirists are filizten, daughter of sultan abdulhamid II; and Safiye, concubine to Sultan Murad V; Princess Ayse, a schoolteacher who instructed the grandchildren and harem ladies of Sultan Mehmed V.

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Osman's Dream: The History of the Ottoman Empire

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Basic Books #ad - The definitive history of the Ottoman EmpireThe Ottoman Empire was one of the largest and most influential empires in world history. Its reach extended to three continents and it survived for more than six centuries, but its history is too often colored by the memory of its bloody final throes on the battlefields of World War I.

In this magisterial work-the first definitive account written for the general reader-renowned scholar and journalist Caroline Finkel lucidly recounts the epic story of the Ottoman Empire from its origins in the thirteenth century through its destruction in the twentieth.

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Nature's Metropolis: Chicago and the Great West

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W. W. Norton & Company #ad - A finalist for the Pulitzer Prize and Winner of the Bancroft Prize. Jackson, Boston Globe. No one has written a better book about a city…Nature's Metropolis is elegant testimony to the proposition that economic, and business history can be as graceful, urban, powerful, environmental, and fascinating as a novel.

Kenneth T.

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